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CSPAN
Dec 23, 2012 1:00pm EST
experiences on the united states commission on civil rights, set up by president eisenhower in the 1950s senate. this is about half an hour. >> host: on your screen now as a well-known face for c-span viewers. that is mary frances berry, professor university of pennsylvania and also the author of several books, where the university of pennsylvania to talk to her about this book, justice for all. united states commission on civil rights and continuing struggle for freedom in america. mary frances berry, when did the u.s. civil rights commission began and why? >> guest: well, the civil rights commission started in 1957. president eisenhower had a lot of discussions with john foster dulles, secretary of state about the way the united states is seen around the world because of the racism going on, that people would hear about and read about and the fact that there seemed to be a lot of episodes that kept happening, whether as lynching or some discrimination taking place in the country. so the idea was eisenhower said he was going to ask congress to set up a civil rights commission, which wou
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 1:00am EST
on civil rights in the continuing struggle for freedom in america quote. when did this all rights commission begin? >> 1957. president eisenhower had a lot of discussion with john foster dulles the secretary of state because of the races around the world people would hear about and read about and the fact there seemed to be episodes whether lynching or discrimination in the country. eisenhower said he would ask congress to set up a civil-rights commission to put the facts on the table and i am told by someone at the meeting he slammed the table and they will put the facts on the table. policy is sometimes said up because there is a tough problem is that the report then they go away but in the future would depend on what it found out and how aggressive it was in the public thought about it. >>host: initially it was set up as a temporary commission? >>guest: right. the right age one year before the overall crisis. it was too diffuse part of the crisis to present a better image of the country to the world. if on the way they could recommend solutions, that would be great. >>host: who
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 4:15pm EST
, when president kennedy's legislative program, civil rights and every one of his other major bills as well was stalled by the southern committee chairman who controlled congress as they had been controlling it for a quarter of the century, to see him get the program up and running, ramming it through to what lyndon johnson do that in the first weeks after kennedy's assassination is a lesson in what a president can do if he now knows all of the levers to pull, but has the will, lyndon johnson's case, almost vicious drive to do it to win, to say over and over again as i am always saying to myself when i am doing the research, look what he is doing here. i don't say i succeeded but i try to explain that in my books and to me, to see him do that is something that is not only fascinating but revelatory, giving a true insight into how power works in washington and there's another reason that i don't get tired of doing these books of lyndon johnson. you are always learning something new and that goes even if what you are researching is something that has been written about 1,000 or 10,000
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 7:00pm EST
way. here are the confrontations of the civil rights movement and the life decisions being made during the cuban missile crisis. people often ask me why my fatherfather install the systems. as a lover of history, i know he would've been talk of this new technology as a way of keeping an accurate record of events for the memoir he planned to write after leaving office. after the bay of pigs, people say he wanted to be able to remember who said what in case they later changed their tune. [laughter] the wonderful thing about this book is that although much of this material has been available, it has not been easily acceptable until now. the original recordings of of varying quality, and it is not always clear who is speaking in meetings. working with our outstanding archivist, historian ed widmer did an extraordinary job. in election season, i find it fascinating to listen to my father talk about what kind of person succeeds in politics. he believed the time for changing, and he was right for the time. it is interesting to apply his standards to the current campaign. he talks about the od
CSPAN
Dec 27, 2012 6:00am EST
civil rights act of '64, the voting rights act of '65. fair housing act of '86. republicans and democrats in the spirit that you are calling for, and i have one other thought since we're talking about our sponsoring institutions for this extraordinary conversation, that's the national archive -- i think that the framers of the constitution who were amending their regime, studied what had gone they studied the state constitution. saw which ones worked and didn't. massachusetts put the constitution to a vote let's put our constitution to a vote. most of the constitutions have three banch branches of government. let's go with that. most have vie -- an independent executive works well for massachusetts and new york. let's build on that. many of the bill of rights. george mason he gives u.s. virginia bill of rights. that's model for the federal bill of rights. abolition of slavery occurred in several states. and we have to study, you know, and make amendments. what has gone before us. we have the duty to the future, i think we danger it best when we actually are understanding or resp
CSPAN
Dec 26, 2012 8:00pm EST
assistant secretary for civil rights in the u.s. department of education and chairman of the u.s. equal opportunity commission from 1982 to 1990. he became a judge of the u.s. court of appeals and in the district of columbia circuit in 1990. president bush nominated him as associate justice of the supreme court and he took his seat on october 23, 1991. ladies and gentlemen please welcome justice thomas and professor amar to the stage. [applause] [applause] >> the thank you ladies and gentlemen for that extraordinarily gracious ,-com,-com ma warm welcome. thank you to the national archives and to the staff for making this event possible and thanks also, special thanks to the federalist society and the constitution accountability center and thank you justice thomas for being with us today as we marked the 225th earth day, 225th anniversary of our constitution. i guess i would like to start our conversation with the words of the constitution, we the people, and what that phrase means to you and how that phrase baby has changed over time thanks to amendments and developments. who is this a
CSPAN
Dec 29, 2012 6:00pm EST
way? where did it come from? >> guest: probably having parents that were civil rights activists in the '60s in the bay area. that was probably my initial interest. i saw their activism, and that was important. but also, i think i became interested in international affairs at spelman, in particular for s--from some courses that i took, and then harvard was a wonderful place to study international relations. the end of the cold war story became important to me later on in my graduate career when i took a job, to the dismay of my dissertation adviser, to do the research for george shultz's memoir and--out at stanford. c-span: why--why to the dismay? >> guest: oh, because it was such a huge project for some--someone who was working on her own dissertation, to take on another project, and--but i thought it was a great opportunity. c-span: how did that happen? >> guest: in 1989, i moved out to california to work with condi rice, who was my outside reader on my thesis committee, partly, and also to be in the bay area, and she got a job in the bush at the first bush administration, and so i ju
CSPAN
Dec 28, 2012 8:00pm EST
take three long weeks for those eggs to hatch. the civil rights movement taught me patience. never give up, never to give in, to never give up, but to always keep your eyes on the prize. so across the bridge is about patients, about how, truth, love and reconciliation. now when i was growing up in rural alabama and was visiting a town of troy, visiting montgomery, visited tuskegee and later as a student in nashville, tennessee and made a living in atlanta. i saw the sign said white men, colored women, colored rating, white waiting. as a child my mother, father, grandparents said that's the way it is. don't get in the way, don't get in trouble. but in 1855 at the age of 15, i heard of rosa parks. i heard of martin luther king junior. in 1957 at the age of 17 i never said parks. the next year at the age of 18, i meant to her martin luther king junior. the action of rosa parks, people in my camera and leadership of dr. king inspired me to get in the way, to get in trouble. for more than 50 years have been getting in trouble, good chabot, necessary travel. [applause] so across that bri
CSPAN
Dec 28, 2012 11:00pm EST
fools to start if you suggested. delete a program called, who is the dean of the civil rights movement, dean of black leadership, who at the whole idea about the march on washington almost 50 years ago would say from time to time, maybe our foremothers and forefathers thought came to this great land in different shapes. but we all in the same boat now. so it doesn't matter whether we are black or white, latino, asian american or native american. it doesn't matter whether a democrat or republicans. it doesn't matter whether we are straight. it does another whether jewish or not psalm, christians, we are one people. we are one family. we are one house spirit that's what the struggle been about. [applause] this book, "across that bridge" is saying in effect they struggle is a struggle to retain the soul of america. it's not a struggled the last one day, one week, one month, one year for one lifetime. maybe we take more than one lifetime to create a more perfect union. to create the beloved community. the community at peace with itself. now you heard david tell you that i did get arrested
CSPAN
Dec 26, 2012 12:00pm EST
country, lawyers have experience a lot of pain in the civil rights movement. so my question is, in line with the comment about practical steps, what would be a facing of the introduction of the rule of law that might be suggested to the chinese government and to chinese political and legal leaders as a way to avoid these calamitous events and bring about the rule of law? >> can you suggest to them that they pay the judges and say we will reducers our, we won't fire you? they might be willing to do that. and after they did that, you know, judges would love it, and nobody else would like it. but i mean, they would do, or maybe they would say we have an administrative law grow here. by the way, let's have all the corporate cities on television. the proceeding, i'm not saying the deliberations. why don't he they do that? let's not get into that. 5 let's have the trials and all those things. they do that. maybe they would, or maybe, what about this arbitration resolving business differences, would you be willing to take some the judges? after all, you're not paying them and you can't fi
CSPAN
Dec 26, 2012 11:00pm EST
doesn't seem like very long ago. that's 34 years after the 1964 civil rights act. according to the latest census, one in four americans describe themselves as being something other than black. african-americans are not the largest minority group anymore. they have not been for a while. latinos are a larger minority group. neither one of them is the fastest growing racial minority group. the fastest growing one is asian american. white americans are growing only had a 5.7% rate. another rapidly growing group of people like our president. who could check more than one box in the race and ethnicity section of their questionnaire. it seems to me that we cannot have a legal regime that sorts people according to their skin color and what country their ancestors came from. and treat some people better and other people worse based on what boxley check. okay? now, frequently the people who are arguing in favor, and i think this issue all the time, let me tell you. two minutes and today we are not talking about the educational benefits within a conversation. we are talking about slavery. we
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 6:00pm EST
openness to change to experimentation are deeply embedded in the city. and now that we won our own civil war and the size are enshrined, it's the rest of the country that's wrestling with them right now. it's only as recent as president obama's embrace of gay marriage that shows how relevant these ideals are. i'm part of the city. i think it's a laboratory for the new. it's a laboratory for the new ideas for medical marijuana to gay marriage to immigrant sanctuary, a lovable minimum wage. universal health care, which is something that dr. smith in the free clinic is popularized, health care is a right not a privilege. all of these values were fought out first in san francisco not the rest of the country to the horror of fox news is grappling with them. so i say right now, san francisco. [applause] >> i'd like to give an anecdote to your comments. [inaudible] -- to kind of wipe my her race ends to bistros to cut is going to under the armpits of the united states. i ended up with my first job in richmond, virginia. and my landlady, landlord to be, the bugs, they like the grandfather of the
CSPAN
Dec 23, 2012 9:15am EST
around from point to point as we were advised by john door, my iconic civil rights hero and nicholas katzenbach. he was to have as much freedom as any other student. well, yes. but at the same time, there are deer hunters, and it was the season, and we had cop instant, we were constantly aware who might come up on to the campus, didn't look like a student, had a bent mind and a deer rifle, and we had to be constantly aware of that kind of threat to his life. he was a brave person. i was sitting in his dormitory room the first couple days reading the hate mail, the death threats. very accurate, very detailed. james, we know where you live, we know where your participants are -- parents are, we're going to kill you and we're going to kill your twins. he looked at me and said, lieu tempt, i'm late for my spanish class. let's go. that kind of courage stayed with him throughout my association with him. he never cracked, he never blinked. the students blinked. i should say that 99% of the student body went about their way getting an education. they cared little about him being on the campu
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 5:00pm EST
think lyndon johnson cared about civil-rights. the second part of your question, how did he get kennedy -- it takes a lot of pages in this book to talk about all the things he does but the thing he does on the instant, this bill appears to be totally dead. he says didn't someone file a discharge petition? discharge petition had been filed -- this bill was in a committee that was never going to let it out. wasn't even the senate. still in the house rules committee which was shared by judge howard w. smith and would even give a date. the bill was going nowhere. johnson remembers someone filed a discharge petition to take away from that committee. that was -- a discharge petition ever -- never passed. violation of house rules and no president had ever gotten behind one before. johnson calls the representative who introduces it and representative of missouri has been told by the leaders dropped this thing and listen to johnson in this telephone call to see a genius in human nature because the first half of the call, we can't violate the house precedents. then up next on booktv after
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 9:00am EST
thurmond's career, the vikings 1957 civil rights bill. why the south must prevail a. four days before thurmond historic filibuster. i'm quoting now from that editorial. 57, the "national review." essential question that emerges is whether the white community in the south isn't up to take such measures as are necessary to prevail politically and culturally in areas in which it does not predominate in america. the sobering answer is yes. the white community is so entitled because for the time being it is the advanced race. buckley, jr. and thurmond would seem to occupy separate polls in conservative politics. their actions alone marked a alone marked their different backgrounds and experiences. it is easy to forget that buckley was once a fledgling writer and publisher trying to stimulate himself and the world of politics and letters. the son of a oil baron, and thurmond was a priceless compact, father and son both. later, after a seachange inaugurated on the civil rights movement, thurmond would not be the only conservative leader with a segregationist record in need of scrubbing. in t
CSPAN
Dec 29, 2012 8:15pm EST
and be it in the car so they could be together. very much like the deep south before the civil rights movement. you know there is nothing like that in israel. in fact, the judge, one of the judges that made the decision as to the former president of israel being jailed for sexual assault was an arab. there are ebbs in the knesset. there are arabs everywhere that are both pro-israel and not pro-israel but they are actively involved in the community. so it's an absurd -- the apartheid wall i guess is the prop for this because they put a wall up to protect the israelis from suicide bombers, which has been about 90% successful. but that was the prop and everybody has their picture taken in israel so that is kind of where the jump off point was. he never actually said it was apartheid but they used the hook is a title and this sort of ongoing accusation. but malcolm headings becomes rather defaced when the subject arises and that is how he feels. >> you tell some other things in the book, you know, reject the notion that essentially the jewish and arab or muslim for that matter are
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 8:30pm EST
. but it was an only abolitionist point out. it was very much further by the civil war. almost always are a decent democratic societies, certainly in the united states, war has been an engine of civil right. because you might be able to afford the waste of human resources involved in discrimination against a race or class or gender in peace time. when you have to rally resources of the nation to take on a crisis like the civil war, like world war ii, you need everybody. pretty quickly by the end of 1862, you have women running the entire public health system, towards the and clara barton were important figures in washington and airways -- there was when the soldiers needing treatment and there was no preparation for them. and these partially women volunteers created the response. i wasn't the war department. linking you see and has laconic patience and very pragmatic way adjusting to these new realities every day. these dichotomies and lichen, a very important one was this huge fish and over three generations from now will be richer from europe and the lazio at the same time would say
CSPAN
Dec 27, 2012 11:00pm EST
lewis and the work of the civil rights activist in the 1960s. and thomas mann and norm ornstein on their book of partisanship in congress. >> the tension builds in one of the things that happens during that time is that a soviet submarine is found by american ships. and there are charges on a soviet submarine. a knock out the electrical system. the carbon dioxide is rising. people are passing out inside the submarine. they have no communication with the commander. the commander loads the torpedo, the war started already in the war is starting. they want to launch the nuclear torpedo. fortunately, one of the other commanders on the ship from a lower rank talked him out of it. it might have saved the world. >> of this is so close to the edge. it really was one of the scariest moments after this. >> they said we didn't notice. honestly, we were teenagers. my god, we wouldn't even be here to talk. >> director oliver stone and peter koznick of the untold history of united states senator nunn on 10:00 p.m. eastern on booktv's "after words." part of four days of nonfiction authors and boo
CSPAN
Dec 27, 2012 8:00pm EST
helpful history around the time adult issues. it's an iconic place for the civil rights struggle and the children's crusade in 1963. but what is he able to do in birmingham in a way that challenges what we think about this. >> he did not want to be a farmer. he did not want to be a sharecropper. this is a place that early on was that segregated. we think about her manhattan is misrepresented -- but the office, when he first appears in the census as a homeowner has white neighbors end up with that, not the time. it was a place where someone who wanted to make his mark at at the field could do that. >> so he buys property? >> he buys property. >> another property owner. >> between you and me again -- >> s., make and found office. >> he really is an amazing carrier chair and he becomes for you one of the most distant relatives who has this amazing story. but you also find people you interview the new doll face and also new melvina. so tell us how you were able to write about melvina life. >> one of the amazing things has been able to find people who actually knew melvina can a woman born in
CSPAN
Dec 23, 2012 11:00am EST
of some of the most dramatic events that occurred in the civil rights movement. and one of those occurred in my hometown of marion, alabama. pretty dramatic. >> host: now, where do you live now, first of all? >> guest: i live in tuscaloosa, alabama, which is 60 miles up the road but almost in another, more recent century than my small hometown. >> host: and darkroom is a lot about the civil rights movement and some of the experiences that you had. >> guest: yes. >> host: want to start with your father. what did he do for a living, and what was his experience like? >> guest: my father was a teacher. he had a background also in the ministry, but he was an amateur photographer. he did some freelance work, and that figures centrally in my book, "darkroom." >> host: and i wanted to ask about his ministering, because he'd been assigned to some churches, and you write about that in here. what was his experience? >> guest: well, this wasn't, actually, my family ice first immigration period before i was born. so in 1948 my father came to the u.s., and he studied at a seminary in new orlea
CSPAN
Dec 22, 2012 4:30pm EST
taught in the civil rights movement. fingerprints will treat me like they used to. since i lay my burden down. way down the burden of prejudice and narrowmindedness. it's a huge burden to lay down. there will be a time when the friends you had a special treat you like they used to. and accessing what my friend teaches me about consciousness. >> to access that. i was reading this while doing my cardio in "the new york times." and i said, it came to me. we shouldn't be burning carranza, we should be reading carranza. so we put together this program of three of my closest muslim friends and talk about what it means to me. and lalo came and spoke. i asked her why she does what she does. and she said, it is to keep my consciousness of god to alive. i think that's what we're talking about in part. keeping that a lie. would which you know will never abandon you and your friends. >> is their phone you wanted to and with? in this beautiful conversation? >> why don't you do that. >> these are yours. out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and right doing, there is a field. when the soul lies down an
CSPAN
Dec 27, 2012 9:00am EST
of the 1964 civil rights act. not all of it, just the problem part. i say there's only one -- [inaudible] in this so i'm not picking and choosing. quote: no person in the unite shall on the -- in the united states shall on the basis of color or national origin be subjected to discrimination under any program or activity receiving federal financial assistance. that's what happened to abigail fisher. it's not disputed. she was treated different lit because of -- differently because of her race, color and national origin. now, we're not going to be talking so much about title vi tomorrow, we're going to be talking about the constitution because the supreme court said, well, that doesn't really mean what it says, you know? we think that it just means what the constitution means. and the constitution is, you know, has a little more egg l room,al -- wiggle l room,al l though not a lot. the constitution outlawed, i mean, the whole purpose of the equal protection or the 14th amendment was to outlaw racially-separate legal standards. that seems pretty straightforward too. and, you k
CSPAN
Dec 29, 2012 10:30am EST
experience of america which has put the economic question front and center. unlike the civil-rights and feminists and many other important movements of our time where there was fear of going in that direction, they were not ready for it, the police would be angry and arrest of a. this is a movement that's that we are putting the question of the 1% and 99% front and center. that opens a space that this book is not doable without the space opened by occupy wall street or the interests. if i am correct in understanding this, its third printing and it only appeared in may of this year, the thanks go to the people like the occupy wall street people who are willing to break from the tradition not to be limited by the end dumb ~ either/or republican and democrat and are willing to push in another direction. >> another question on the occupy movement, what has happened to it? it seems to have gone into some sort recess for stasis. >> a great political leader of the left whose name i won't mention because it frightens people is well known for having said political movements do not develop in a s
CSPAN
Dec 28, 2012 6:00am EST
wyoming senator alan simpson. after that congressman john lewis on the civil-rights activist work in the 1960s and later congressional scholar thomas mann and norman ornsetein in their partnership in congress. >> author edward klein joined booktv at freedom fest to talk about his new york times best selling book "the amateur". he looks critically at president obama before and after he reached the white house. here is what he had to say. >> the book currently on your screen has spent several weeks on the new york times best-seller list, many weeks at number one. "the amateur" has been written by edward klein who is our guest, booktv on c-span2. where did you get a title for this book? >> guest: it came from a meeting bill clinton had in chapel:00, new york, north of new york city where he has a home. this was back in august of 2011. his wife, his daughter and a bunch of friends to meet with him because he had news. he had done a secret poll in 2011 and polls showed if hillary clinton would challenge barack obama for the democratic presidential nomination in 2012, he thought she could
CSPAN
Dec 23, 2012 6:00pm EST
campaign civil rights division. in that capacity, leading a campaign, he convinced kennedy to telephone caruthers scott king in the matter of his imprisonment on the trumped up charges. it was a risky move given the residual racism that still tainted american life. but many analysts had concluded that the phone call attracted enough african-american votes to the democratic party that your to win a razor-thin victory to john kennedy. after the inauguration, president kennedy asked shriver to assume leadership as the founding director of the peace corps. when asked why he had selected his brother in law for the job, kennedy said that if the project were to become a flop, it would be easier to fire a member of the family when a political ally. when we look at the origins of the peace corps today we have to be careful not to read history backwards or to argue that the success of the peace corps was inevitable. it wasn't so in 1961. deep in the cold war, many thoughtful people were skeptical putting their reputation and presence of the united states in underdeveloped countries into the hands
CSPAN
Dec 21, 2012 11:00pm EST
overcome the black civil rights movement for my first example and the suffrage yet movement as my second. but we're still discriminating. at the time, the phrase, equality for all -- it's ridiculous with the age discrimination regarding minimum wage in order to increase the quality in our democracy the manipulate wage needs to be standard figure for all. the thought that young people are below their infear you're colleagues and less deserving of a higher wage is outdated, ewan equal. we need to fight for civil liberties for all young people, and with that comes minimum wage for all and for that reason it should be our national campaign. [applause] >> thank you. i'm sorry. we have to wind up the debate because we have reached our allotted time. i just want before i call -- to welcome the honorable gentlemen, colonel stewart, who entered the chamber at the back. [applause] >> bob, thank you for your support for the uk youth parliament. now i'd like to ask to conclude the debate from scotland, mr. reardon fortune to wind up the debate. [applause] >> thank you, mr. speaker. i would fi
CSPAN
Dec 22, 2012 10:00pm EST
seeing what was coming. >> guest: right, when you came up on someone. vermont has no rules at all about that, but anyway, the -- >> host: the slave issue. >> guest: slaves also before the civil war, didn't have guns, and whites in the south, some of them began to see personal firearms as a means of defending themselves against slave rebelling, if they needed to. later on approaching the civil war, abolition a strong movement, abolitionists wanted to provide guns to no slavery and vice versa so they wanted to go to kansas to defend themselves against tax by their opponents. the ku klux klan and groups like that arose persecuting freed blacks in the south, and the blacks began to look for ways to defend themselves. the federal government tried to institute new state militias in the southern states, and blacks saw them as a way of self-defense. >> host: guns played a role in history. what was the legal understanding. when there were restrictions, did they consider that unconstitutional or one they thought as an urban area or city on the frontier trying to get its act together? >> guest: od
CSPAN
Dec 27, 2012 12:00pm EST
protect the civil liberties of law-abiding american citizens. a right to private communications, free from the prying eyes and ears of the government, should be the rule, not the exception for american citizens on american soil whom law enforcement has no reason to suspect of wrongdoing. and yet, the legislation that we debate on this senate floor today, the fisa amendments act, or the foreign intelligence surveillance act, amendments act, would reauthorize surveillance authority that most americans, most of the delawareans whom i represent would be shocked to learn that the government has in the first place. under section 702, fisa permits the government to wiretap communications in the united states without a warrant if it reasonably believes the target of the wiretap to be outside of the country and has a significant purpose of acquiring foreign intelligence information. of course communications are by definition between two or more people. so even if one participant is outside our country, the person they're talking to may be here in the united states, and they may well be a
CSPAN
Dec 30, 2012 4:15pm EST
i saw trying to piece together what happened in my family, my father stated died in the wall civil-rights liberal and my mother although i don't think she ever called herself a republican was a little ashamed of voting for nixon did, there was a sense of fear, the unraveling, the movement of the 60s were fantastic and a lot of us in this room, something else that happened in the 60s was there was a lot of turmoil. we saw a change in the economy we didn't recognize coming and people were able to mistake racial change and social change for why jobs for these working-class men were going away. i saw in my own family that my mother, one brother was in new york city cop and one was a firefighter, they were working in the increasingly dangerous city and there was a sense that change had moved too fast and we needed to put it back in the bottle if we could. this is the sense that republicans exploited. i like to remind people that five days after lyndon johnson signed the voting rights act, riots erupted in flames. it was the beginning of the nixone n\ where the l.a. police chief blamed t
CSPAN
Dec 27, 2012 5:00pm EST
that our civil liberties and our right to privacy need to be protected, and i do not believe that they're sufficiently protected under the current law. and so, simply extending current law for five more years is irresponsible, and it's not a rephrebg shun of our -- reflection of our values. there are few ways this bill falls short and i'm especially concerned about the practice of reverse targeting. the deputy majority leader talked about it about an hour ago. the intelligence community does not need a warrant to conduct surveillance on someone located overseas, and i think we can all agree there is no problem there. the problem comes when the intelligence committee conducts surveillance on someone overseas where the real purpose is to gain information about someone right here in america. that can happen without a warrant, and we should not let that happen without a warrant. our national security is not threatened if we require this information to be tagged and sequestered and subject to judicial review. it would merely ensure that the information intercepted overseas in the form
CSPAN
Dec 21, 2012 7:00pm EST
every standard of civilized society. by bringing an even more fox tick mix -- toxic mix or reckless behavior and criminal cruelty right into our homes every minute, every day, every hour of every single year. a child growing up in america today witnesses 16,000 murders and 200,000 acts of violence by the time he or she reaches the ripe old age of 18. and throughout it all, too many in the national media, their corporate owners and their stockholders act as silent enablers, if not complicit co-conspirators. rather than face their own moral failings, the media demonize gun owners. [inaudible conversations] >> the reckless behavior coming from the nra! the nra has blood on its hands! the nra has blood on its hands! shame on the nra! ban assault weapons now! ban assault weapons now! nra, ban assault weapons now! stop killing our children! stop the reckless behavior of the nra! we need gun control now! >> rather than face their own moral failings, the media demonize lawful gun owners, amplify their cries for more laws and fill the national media with misinformation and dishonest thinking
CSPAN
Dec 26, 2012 3:00am EST
civil war went to the courthouse and lined up to get their marriages, their relationships legitimized and recognize under the law and the lot of people did that. >> i think that is right too. i wonder, i am curious, how did first lady michelle ng obama respond to the news when you talk to her or this was brought to her? >> one of the challenges for those of us writing about the first lady is she is not doing any book interviews at all. i didn't get to talk to her about this but when the article came out, her husband's press secretary was asked about it and said she sounded fascinating. i know her family finds it fascinating and i think it was something they simply -- simply didn't know about. i briefed her staff along the way as i was doing my research and gave her and members of the family, i hope she find it fascinating. >> one thing i did read in the new york times when your article was published, she did have a positive reaction to if, and at some point she even traveled to africa with the children to see the places where the slaves were housed or africans when they we
CSPAN
Dec 26, 2012 9:00am EST
. title vii under the civil rights act was in 1964, all on discrimination on the basis -- outlawed discrimination on the basis of discrimination -- religion, and sex. and 1950s, law firms, and some of the finest graduates were saying they wanted no women. they would feel uncomfortable dealing with a woman, or as often her, we hired a woman at this from once, and she was dreadful. how many men did they hire that didn't work out? so it wasn't easy to get that first job. first job was all important because if you got it and performed well, then the next job was secure. well, i had a great professor, someone may know you -- some of you may know his name, he was the first constitutional law scholar, and he was in charge of getting judicial clerkship for columbia law school students. and i was special. he was determined to give me a federal clerkship. so he recommended me to a judge who always hired his law clerks from columbia. and then -- [inaudible] is ruth bader ginsburg. she has a four year old daughter. how can i rely on her? and the professor said, give her a chance. if she doesn'
CSPAN
Dec 22, 2012 2:00am EST
is wrong, that discrimination was overcome the black civil rights movement for my first example and the suffrage yet movement as my second. but we're still discriminating. at the time, the phrase, equality for all -- it's ridiculous with the age discrimination regarding minimum wage in order to increase the quality in our democracy the manipulate wage needs to be standard figure for all. the thought that young people are below their infear you're colleagues and less deserving of a higher wage is outdated, ewan equal. we need to fight for civil liberties for all young people, and with that comes minimum wage for all and for that reason it should be our national campaign. [applause] >> thank you. i'm sorry. we have to wind up the debate because we have reached our allotted time. i just want before i call -- to welcome the honorable gentlemen, colonel stewart, who entered the chamber at the back. [applause] >> bob, thank you for your support for the uk youth parliament. now i'd like to ask to conclude the debate from scotland, mr. reardon fortune to wind up the debate. [applause] >> th
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 9:15am EST
fixed bayonets and charged across the field and they yelled the rebel yell right out of the civil war. one of the rangers said it was one of the most glorious moments to be a ranger. as they charged across the field was the perfect time. the artillery was now falling on the germans rather than a sunken road. was the perfect window of opportunity and they seized the pillboxes and went up the hill. what happens next is unbelievable. with hardly any men they started out with roughly 120 men, they lost many men in the charge, lost men, ran up the hill, i have been to this place and toward it with a german veterans, ran up the hill and took the pillbox that was on top of the hill which was the main center of gravity because it offered protection and the protection it offered was from the artillery. picture a rainstorm but instead of raindrops it with shrapnel and tree splitters. 18 battalions of german artillery rained down on that hill, killing germans and americans alike. it became unbearable. on top of that, within half an hour, 45 minutes, the germans according to their doctor and bega
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 8:45pm EST
terrific historians have written in their books. craig rights in the civil war at sea the naval forces did not determine the outcome of the civil war to the north would have won the war might even without the naval supremacy. but the naval forces affected its trajectory and very likely its length and that in the end was important enough. jim goes a little bit further, and i quote, to say the union army won the civil war would still the case much too strongly but it is accurate to say that couldn't have been without the contribution of the navy. we will let you fight it out on some future arena. but i will end officially by pointing something not be heard about this problem that they had with each other and these gentlemen are such good colleagues to me and each other jim mcpherson calls him the civil war at sea in his official appraisal and an outstanding study of the union and confederate navy and he calls his war on the water in importance story written with an eloquent him. so we have a quandary in the tough economic times. [laughter] a choice to be made. how to do it i found the perfec
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 4:15pm EST
ransoming off people back to the family. that's one whole aspect in any sort of civil war type situation, which it really is right now. you have the criminalization of society in many ways from people who are trying to make a living possible, and then you have groups that become invested in the civil war and the continuing of the civil war you saw something similar in lebanon. i wrote a piece recently in monitor called the lebanonizeation of syria, and unfarmly, of the many scenarios that could occur, in syria, because it does seem to be -- there's no easy answer. there is absolutely no easy answer to this. american intervention is not the answer. and i would be happy to talk more about that perhaps in the q & a session. what happened in -- what will happen probably in syria, unless the equation on one side or the ice dramatically changed. you have this balance of forces almost where neither side has the wherewithal to land the knockout punch and both sides think they can win and it's very difficult to intervene with any sort of negotiated solution with both sides think they ca
CSPAN
Dec 26, 2012 12:45am EST
natural harbors and rivers that run the right way but that was true for thousands of years and didn't leave to the development to rate civilization and european civilization and began to make powerful use of those the geographical advantages are obvious, so help us think about why it's geography that we should focus on as opposed to the cultural or civilization will aspect. >> that was due to the development of the failing chips which enable the croswell landed voyages, so that development of technology while it is short in distance it did not negate, it made it more important because it opened up a whole new geography and the world trade system cultural and economics flow from the geography because what is culture? it is the accumulated experience of a specific people on may specifically and skate over hundreds of thousands of years that leads to tradition and habits that can be identifiable. one of the places i've always considered to have the most deeply denzel identifiable culture shock is remaining. you know, nobody can admit there's a specific romanian culture that's been formed
CSPAN
Dec 23, 2012 6:30am EST
for not freeing his slaves. you're quite right. he never intended to faith and even if he hadn't been in debt. but he did argue that to do so would be civil war and that the only solution would be a scheme in which all slaves moved to the caribbean or back to africa. and, of course, you could argue that it's not justification but it's also a reason worth considering. i came at this very differently. i was a caribbean scholar working on -- these are some of the most your awful regimes anywhere. and i was very aware -- [inaudible] the moral issue of slavery. they never discussed it before or during the american revolution. in fact the first place is what discusses here in america, even -- being opposed to slavery itself was remarkable. it's only in the western only in the 18th century that you have an abolition movement. people actually questioning the morality of slavery. so to me, jefferson was remarkable in that he actually questioned the system and had enough empathy to realize that slaves freed would be so angry at the way they were treated that it might actually rebel. i don't kno
CSPAN
Dec 22, 2012 10:00am EST
we do need to get a little more aggressive especially when civil liberties have apparently been infringed upon. i also have the observation that government lawyers, i would say this. when you are the government you have an obligation to make things right. if you have done some the wrong he should make it right. it is not a good comparison but i remember when i was in the military, medical malpractice cases, if we were wrong we figure out how big the check was going to be, that is the right thing to do when you are the government. this is an important question and i urge you to take a look. >> judge brown elevated, make a difference? >> i think there would be a difference of opinion, correctly decided in the first interest and whether subsequent practical experience had led one to the conclusion, i fundamentally agree with what charlie was saying about i started at the justice department office of legal counsel after september 11th. i thought our was going to do establishment cause but national security, counterterrorism, international law, we sat down and looked at all of these
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 4:00am EST
wrote a book called "sons of mississippi," the book previous to this, a study of the civil rights south and integration of james meredith at the university of ol miss. i like to pick out subjects that i feel have a lot of resonance to the culture history biography. >> and paul's most recent book national book critic circle
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 6:00am EST
politics, this is in civil rights. for our fellow citizens race was an issue to be adjudicated within the context of a complex american national identity that was founded on certain principles and ideals enshrined legally and what allison called quote sacred document. starting my own doctoral work in english and american literature in the united states in 1968, has confessed talked about come i was swept along as so many of us were in 1960s and early 1970s by the force of social and political changes involving race that were transforming american culture. choosing a dissertation topic, i turned away almost instinctively from traditional literary criticism, much as i love poetry, i did not want to write a book of literary criticism of the traditional kind. dimly recognizing what i thought was a crisis of representation, we as black americans were concerned, i turned to a biography out of a sense of biography offered an almost uniquely effective way to address what i've called a crisis of representation. when i found myself seated to the bone by passages about race in trenches 19 is a c
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